Best fixed blade knives for survival in 2017

best fixed blade knives

In our article on folding knives, we discussed how a folding knife is the tactical gear of choice for EDC and simple camping tasks. However, if you are into bushcraft, hardcore wilderness survival camping or hunting, you need a more “serious” fixed-blade knife for your needs.

Fixed-blade knives are generally considered more durable, easier to maintain and superior for heavy-duty tasks such as splitting wood, cutting through the bone of the game and tactical activities. But which are the best fixed-blade knives for hunting, camping, and survival?

In this article, we will look at the best fixed-blade knives available in the market. Our focus will be to focus on the best knives in three price ranges – less than $50, between $50 and $100 and between $100 and $200 bucks. While you can get a knife with a blade length in excess of 8-inches ala Rambo, we would primarily list knives with a blade length of less than 6 inches, as that is a good enough blade size for most outdoor activities.

We will also look at some of the factors to consider while picking the best knives for your needs. A word of advice – Check out the regulations in your state, county or city to ensure compliance before ordering one.

List of best fixed blade knives under $50

Some of the best hunting and survival fixed blade knives costing less than $50 are listed below:
PictureProductDetailsFeatures 

Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge or Serrated
Blade Len.: 4.1"
Thickness: 2.5 mm
Knife Len.: 8.6"
Weight (with sheath): 4 oz.
Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Knife
Type: Plain edge or Serrated
Blade Len.: 4.1”
Thickness: 2.5 mm
Knife Len.: 8.6” 4.0 oz. - Popular, budget fixed blade knife with a blade made with Swedish Sandvik 12C27 steel rated at HRC 57-58.
- Thin, stainless steel blade provides superior corrosion resistance.
- 3/4th tang with a patterned, rubberized plastic handle with high-friction grip.
- Comes with a one-piece hard plastic sheath with a belt clip for easy carry.
- Backed by Limited Lifetime manufacturer warranty.( 1-year for sheath)
- There is a heavier, thicker-blade Companion HD option is also available.
Gerber StrongArm Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge or Partially serrated
Blade Len.: 4.8”
Thickness: 4.8 mm
Knife Len.: 9.8”
Weight (with sheath): 10.9 oz.
- A decent, made in the US knife with a 420HC steel corrosion resistant blade with a ceramic coating.
- Full tang construction with a rubberized, glass-filled nylon handle and a heavy pommel useful for hammering and breaking glass.
- Comes with a unique modular sheath which can be used on any MOLLE panel, along with standard belt carry.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.
Condor Bushlore KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 4.3”
Thickness: 3.2 mm
Knife Len.: 9.3”
Weight (with sheath): 9.2 oz.
- German-design, made in El Salvador knife with an easily- sharpened 1075 carbon steel, spear-point blade.
- Semi-handmade, featuring a vintage walnut hardwood handle.
- Comes with a 100% leather sheath.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.
SOG Seal Pup Fixed Blade KnifeType: Partially serrated
Blade Len.: 4.75”
Thickness: 4.8 mm
Knife Len.: 9.0”
Weight (with sheath): 5.4 oz.
- A smartly designed, made in the US knife with a powder coated, AUS-8 stainless steel, clip point blade, having a rating of HRC 56-57.
- Features a glass-reinforced nylon/Zytel handle with finger grooves for better grip.
- Comes with a high-quality MOLLE compatible, Zydex Nylon sheath with an accessory pouch.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.
- Also has an Elite version with slightly bigger, TiNi Coated blade.
Morakniv Bushcraft Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge or Partially serrated
Blade Len.: 4.3”
Thickness: 3.2 mm
Knife Len.: 9.1”
Weight (with sheath): 5.7 oz.
- Made in Sweden knife with a UHB-20C steel blade. Thicker than the Morakniv Companion blade.
- Blade in DLC coated for long life and the spine is designed for easy use with a Firestarter.
- Ergonomic handle with a high-friction rubber grip for easy control.
- Comes with a lightweight plastic sheath with belt loop for easy carry around.
- Backed by Limited Lifetime manufacturer warranty.( 1-year for sheath)
Kershaw 1895 LoneRock Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 3.75”
Thickness: 3.0 mm
Knife Len.: 8.25”
Weight (with sheath): 6.4 oz.
- Uniquely designed knife with an 8Cr13MoV, titanium carbo-nitride coated blade.
- Features a glass-filled nylon handle, with a popular K-textured grip.
- Comes with a Nylon sheath.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.
Hoffman Richter Wolf Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 4.0”
Thickness: 5.5 mm
Knife Len.: 9.0”
Weight (with sheath): 6.0 oz.
- High-quality German knife made with razor-sharp 440C steel drop-point blade and coated with TiNi for long life.
- Has a tie loop on the handle which can act as glass-breaker.
- Comes with a nylon sheath.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.

List of best fixed blade knives under $100

Some of the best hunting and survival fixed blade knives costing between $50 and $100 are listed below:
PictureProductDetailsFeatures 

Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Campanion Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 5.25”
Thickness: 6.35 mm.
Knife Len.: 10.5”
Weight(with sheath): 15.0 oz.
- Full-tang, heavy-duty, knife made in the US knife, featuring a 1095 Cro-Van steel, drop point blade with a rating of HRC 56-58.
- The blade is high flat-ground and powder coated for durability and weather resistance.
- Features a Grivory (GR Nylon) handle that provides superior grip. The handle has a heavy pommel and oversized lanyard hole. You can also get other handle types such as Micarta.
- Comes with a hard shell, compatible plastic-nylon sheath with a button for securing the knife.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.
Ontario RAT -3 Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge or Partially serrated
Blade Len.: 3.75”
Thickness: 3.56”
Knife Len.: 7.9”
Weight(with sheath): 5.3 oz.
- Popular, made in the US knife featuring a 1095 steel, powder-coated drop-point blade with a rating of HRC 55-57.
- Features canvas-textured Micarta handle.
- Comes with a Nylon sheath.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.
- Also, has longer blade Rat-5 and Rat-7 versions available in the market.
ESEE Izula-II Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 2.63”
Thickness: 3.97 mm
Knife Len.: 6.75”
Weight(with sheath): 3.2 oz.
- An ultralight, perfect concealed carry fixed blade knife that fits most pockets.
- Made in the US with a 1095-steel small blade treated with the proprietary Rowen heat treatment.
- Features a generously sized, canvas Micarta handle.
- Comes with a lightweight plastic molded sheath with a clip to carry around.
- Backed by an unconditional lifetime warranty.
Gerber LMF II Survival KnifeType: Partially serrated
Blade Len.: 4.84”
Thickness: 4.8 mm.
Knife Len.: 10.0”
Weight(with sheath): 11.5 oz.
- A heavy-duty knife with a 420HC stainless steel, drop point blade.
- Features a handle with a glass-filled nylon with TPV over-mold with a pointed stainless steel butt-cap that can be used as a glass breaker.
- Comes with a high-quality fire-resistant Nylon sheath with three retention points and a built-in sharpener.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.
GCS Steel Skinner Bushcraft KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 4.25”
Thickness: 6.35 mm.
Knife Len.: 8.25”
Weight(with sheath): 12.0 oz.
- Heavy blade, made in England bushcraft knife featuring a vacuum D2 full tang steel blade with a rating of HRC 59.
- Features a Linen Micarta Handle with a brass lanyard hole on the end.
- Comes with a handcrafted buffalo hide leather sheath.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.
Buck Knives 117 Special Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 6.0”
Thickness: 4.4 mm
Knife Len.: 10.5”
Weight(with sheath): 7.5 oz.
- Made in the US fixed blade knife with a long 420HC Steel, clip point blade. Rated at HRC 58.
- Features a Phenolic handle with finger grips and aluminum pommel guard for a comfortable grip.
- Comes with a genuine leather sheath.
- Backed by the Buck Forever lifetime warranty
Schrade SCHF1SM Small Extreme Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 5.6”
Thickness: 5.6 mm.
Knife Len.: 10.3”
Weight(with sheath): 12.6 oz.
- Heavy-duty, made in Taiwan fixed blade knife with a 1070 carbon steel spear point blade.
- Features a hollow waterproof handle with 6-pcs bit set stored securely.
- Comes with a Nylon sheath with a removable storage pouch.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.

List of best fixed blade knives under $200

Some of the best hunting and survival fixed blade knives costing between $100 and $200 are listed below:
PictureProductDetailsFeatures 

ESEE 5P Fixed Blade Survival KnifeType: Plain edge or Partially serrated
Blade Len.: 5.25”
Thickness: 6.35 mm.
Knife Len.: 11”
Weight(with sheath): 17.0 oz.
- Popular, heavy-duty made in the US fixed blade knife featuring a drop-point, high carbon 1095 steel blade. Has a hardness rating of HRC 57.
- The blade is textured and black powder coated for corrosion resistance and durability.
- The knife has a canvas Micarta handle with a cord tie hole at the end. The pommel can act as a glass breaker.
- Comes with a standard Kydex sheath with a belt clip for easy carry.
- Backed by unconditional lifetime warranty.
- Also has larger and smaller blade 4P and 6P options available.
Fallkniven F1 Survival KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 3.8”
Thickness: 4.5 mm.
Knife Len.: 8.3”
Weight(with sheath): 5.6 oz.
- Swedish-design, made in Japan knife featuring a drop point blade made from superior VG10 steel with a laminate coating. Rating of HRC58-62.
- Features a high-density plastic handle with the tang extending from the handle for hammering support.
- Comes with a high-quality Leather sheath. Kydex sheath option is also available.
- Backed by a Lifetime warranty.
- Also, has a bigger A1 survival knife version with a 6.3-inch blade.
Benchmade Bushcrafter 162 Fixed Blade KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 4.40”
Thickness: 4.2 mm.
Knife Len.: 9.15”
Weight(with sheath): 7.72 oz.
- A popular made in the US fixed blade knife with an American CPM-S30V premium stainless steel drop point blade. Has a hardness rating of HRC 58-60.
- Features a contoured G10 handle with contours for superior grip.
- Comes with a Full-grain Leather or Kydex sheath with reversible belt loop.
- Backed by Benchmade's lifetime warranty and LifeSharp service warranty for free cleanup and sharpening.
Ontario Black Bird SK-5 KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 5”
Thickness: 3.5 mm
Knife Len.: 10”
Weight(with sheath): 6.8 oz.
- Smartly designed, made in the US knife with a 154CM US stainless steel spear point blade with a hardness rating of HRC 58-60.
- Features an ergonomic G-10/ Micarta handle with a rounded butt and lanyard hole.
- Comes with a Nylon, MOLLE compatible sheath.
- Backed by limited lifetime warranty.
Spyderco Bushcraft PlainEdge KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 3.9”
Thickness: 3.5 mm
Knife Len.: 8.75”
Weight(with sheath): 7.75 oz.
- Made in the US fixed blade knife featuring an O-1 high carbon tool steel full-tang blade.
- Features a G-10 Laminate handle and 0.23-inch blade hole for making tactical spears.
- Comes with a black leather sheath with a single belt loop.
- Backed by Spyderco’ s lifetime warranty and sharpening service support.
Tops Knives B.O.B. Brothers of Bushcraft KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 4.5”
Thickness: 4.8 mm
Knife Len.: 10.0”
Weight(with sheath): 12.0 oz.
- Heavy-duty, made in the US knife with a 1095 carbon steel full-tang blade.
- Features a Canvas Micarta handle with a lanyard hole and a heavy Pommel.
- Comes with a black Kydex sheath with a belt loop.
- Also comes with a small Ferro rod fire-starter and a whistle smartly fitted in the sheath.
- Backed by a limited lifetime warranty.
Bradford Knives Guardian 4 KnifeType: Plain edge
Blade Len.: 4.75”
Thickness: 4.2 mm.
Knife Len.: 9.1”
Weight(with sheath): 5.6 oz.
- Heavy-duty, made in the US knife with a N690 carbon steel full-tang, drop point blade. Stonewash finish.
- Features a curved G-10 handle with scales for comfortable grip.
- Comes with a Kydex sheath with a belt loop.
- Also has a smaller Guardian 3 version with a 3.5” blade available in the market.
- Backed by a limited lifetime warranty by the manufacturer.

Folding Knives vs. Fixed Blade Knives – Which one should you consider?

Just as in our article on folding knives, let us quickly recap some of the major differences between the folding knives and fixed blade knives. As mentioned earlier, most outdoor experts advise to have one of each in your gear collection and carry one based on your requirements.

FactorFixed blade knivesFolding knives
SizeGenerally larger than folding knives of same blade length. Preferred blade length is 4-7 inches.Generally smaller, more compact and lightweight. Preferred blade length in 3-4 inches.
PortabilityCan only be carried visibly in a sheath in belt or ankle holster.Can be carried concealed in a pocket as EDC.
DurabilityExtremely durable because of full-tang construction.Reasonably durable, but not as much as fixed blade knives.
CostGenerally cheaper to own and maintain than folding knives.Can be costly to own and maintain.
MaintenanceThe absence of moving parts means maintenance is relatively easy.Require relatively more maintenance and upkeep.
UtilitySuitable for heavy-duty outdoor tasks during hunting and survival – heavy cutting, digging, splitting wood and tactical activities.Most suitable for small, quick tasks – cutting ropes, slicing and dicing vegetables, sharpening stakes etc.

As you can see from the discussion above, fixed blade knives are more suitable for survival and bushcraft activities such as cutting, digging, splitting wood etc. Moreover, if the situation demands, you can deploy a fixed blade knife in defensive situations more quickly than a folding knife.

How to pick the best fixed blade knife for your needs?

Just like folding knives, picking the best fixed-blade knife can often be a challenge. While fixed blades have a less complicated design than the folders, factors such as blade design, edge retention, size etc. need to be considered in addition to the budget before picking the most suitable one.
Before we did deep into the factors to consider while picking the best fixed-blade knife, here is a schematic view of the knife with major ports duly marked.
Fixed blade knife parts

Prior to looking for a knife, check the statutory regulations in your region to determine any restrictions on blade size and type of knife. Once you have sorted that out and have a budget in mind, you can consider the following major factors. If you already have a good understanding of the design considerations, you can simply skip this section and move to our top picks:

  • Building material of the blade
  • Building material of the handle
  • Blade design
  • Sheath material and design
  • Length and weight of the knife
  • Additional Features and Considerations

Building material of the blade

The reason you see such variations in the prices of knives is primarily attributed to the building material of the blade and the handle. So, as you can imagine, the type of steel for the blade and the material for the handle are one of the most important considerations while picking the best fixed blade knife for your needs.

Fixed blade knives are generally made of two types of steel – stainless steel and carbon steel. The steel is a mixture of Iron and Carbon, along with a few other metals such as Chromium and Vanadium. Stainless-steel has a lower composition of carbon but has a minimum of 10% Chromium. Higher content of Chromium/Vanadium ensures better resistance to corrosion.

The composition of carbon in the steel primarily governs the sturdiness, sharpness and overall quality of the blade. The more the carbon percentage in the steel, the more care the knife blade would need against rust and corrosion. However, carbon steel knives have better sharpening abilities when compared to the stainless-steel knives and you can use the knife for things such as creating a fire by striking against a Ferro-rod.

Some of the most popular steel variants used for blades are listed below. It is worthwhile to mention that most experts consider the heat treatment process followed as important, if not more important, as the steel type:

  • 420HC Steel: High-carbon steel which has decent resistance to corrosion and staining, but is not very tough. The exception is Buck Knives, whose Paul Bos heat treatment process yields a blade that would outlast most better-steel knives.
  • 1075/1095 Steel: Most popular carbon steel used in budget fixed blade knives. Tough with good edge retention, but require additional powder coating for corrosion resistance. Overall a decent pick for budget fixed blade knives.
  • AUS-8: Mid-range stainless steel with good all-round properties – toughness and corrosion resistance. More popular with folding knives.
  • 8Cr13MoV: Another mid-range steel with decent toughness and corrosion, but not as good as AUS-8. Many made in China knives use this steel.
  • VG10, S30V, 154CM, D2: High-end steel alloy compositions with excellent edge retention, toughness and corrosion resistance properties. S30V and 154CM are American made steel, while VG10 is a popular Japanese steel and D2 is a European steel.

Check out the manufacturing material of the blade to judge the toughness, durability, edge retention and corrosion resistance that the knife would offer.

Building material of the handle

The building material of the handle can be broadly classified into metallic and non-metallic and are discussed below.

  • Metallic handles: Such handles include Stainless Steel, Aluminum and Titanium alloy handles. Such handles are stronger, durable and wear-resistant. However, they can also be heavier and slippery when wet. To provide superior grip, such handles generally have scales or finger grooves.
  • Non-metallic handles: Such handles are generally wood, plastic with a rubberized coating (Kraton) or composite – Fiberglass Coated Nylon (FRN), G-10 or Micarta.
    Wood has been the traditional handle type for knives for centuries, however, due to weight, cost and durability considerations, synthetic handles have gained popularity in past couple of decades.
    Plastic/Kraton handles are generally popular with budget knives and are rubberized (coated with rubber) for better grip.
    Synthetic/Composite handles – FRN, Micarta, and G-10 are very comfortable to handle and lighter than the metallic handles. They are however costlier than rubberized-plastic handles and hence found in mid and high-range knives only.

You can often find different handle materials for your favorite knife, so check out all the versions before picking the most suitable one.

Blade design

How the blade is designed is another important criterion to consider for picking the most suitable knife for your needs. Without going into too many details, here are the most important things to consider:

  • Type of blade: Fixed blade knives are generally either plain/straight edge or partially serrated. Most survivalists recommend going for a plain-edge knife as you would get maximum versatility with such a design without worrying a lot about the proper upkeep of serrations.
  • Blade Tip/Point: Fixed-blade knives generally have a spear, drop or clip point blade. In drop point blades, the drop angle is not as pronounced as in the case of some folding knives. Our preference is a spear-point blade such as in Ontario Black Bird SK-5 Knife or a drop-point blade such as in Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Campanion Fixed Blade Knife.
  • Blade Thickness: Blade thickness is of vital importance for a fixed-blade knife, especially if you are going to use it for heavy-duty bushcraft or survival activities. Any knife with a blade thickness of 5 mm or more such as in the ESEE 5P or Ka-Bar Becker can take some real beating.
  • Tang: The best fixed blade knives are full tang. Full-tang means that the blade is built as a single piece from tip to the base and then the handle is riveted upon. Only two of our popular picks – Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Knife and Gerber LMF II Survival Knife are not full-tang to provide electric insulation. Still, full tang knives are generally sturdier, more durable and can withstand the rigors of wilderness better than partial-tang ones.
  • Blade spine/side and grind: Single edge or partial double-edged knives are generally more comfortable to use for meticulous tasks such as cutting ropes, branches etc. Similarly, how the edge is built determines the suitability of the blade for certain tasks. You can check the following article on Lansky sharpener site for more information on different grinds and their uses.

Check out the blade edge type and blade tip/point to determine the best fit. If you are unsure, simply pick a knife with a full tang, plain-edge blade with a drop or spear point.

Sheath material and design

Since a fixed-blade knife is generally carried in a sheath, you need to look out for a knife which has a sheath that can carry your knife conveniently and securely, while you are on the move. You need to consider the building material of the sheath and its design. You can generally get the feedback on the sheath from the reviews of the knife.
The sheaths are made of one of the following materials:

  • Plastic: Non-Kydex plastic sheaths are the cheapest and mostly come with budget knives only. They are relatively weatherproof and can be textured to be fashionable, but generally do not last long.
  • Nylon: Just like for multi-tools, Nylon sheaths are pretty common for budget and mid-range knives. They are lightweight, cheaper and can last longer than plastic, but still not as durable as Kydex or Leather sheaths.
  • Kydex: Kydex is a popular thermoplastic used for making durable weatherproof sheaths and holsters. But because of hard surface, taking out your knife may make a little noise, which can be an irritant while hunting.
  • Leather: Leather is probably the best material for sheaths that is why such sheaths are found only in high-end knives. Leather sheaths are elegant, extremely durable and pretty quiet, though you have to ensure regular care to ensure the longevity of your sheath.

In addition the material of the sheath, you have to look at how the sheath is designed. While almost all options that we listed have sheaths with belt clips, some of them are also MOLLE compatible. Moreover, sheaths such as that with the SOG Seal Pup Fixed Blade Knife also have an additional pouch for storing knife sharpener or fire-starter.
Check out the sheath material and design to pick the most suitable sheath for your needs. You can, however, find compatible custom-made sheaths in the market for your knife, so do not worry a whole lot if you are not comfortable with the sheath that comes with your knife.

Length and weight of the knife

For bushcraft, survival camping or tactical purposes, you need a knife that has a size big enough for activities such as cutting wood, digging holes, skinning game, tactical defense, even cooking.
Typically, a fixed blade knife with a blade length of 4-7 inches and an overall length of around 8-10 inches would be fairly suitable, as it would provide a nice balance between usability, portability, and weight. However, to offer better support for concealed every-day-carry, manufacturers have come up with smaller versions as well. ESEE Izula-II Fixed Blade Knife is one such example – it has a blade length of only 2.63 inches and can be easily carried in the pocket or a tactical sheath.
Closely associated with the size of the knife is the weight of the knife. As discussed above, the blade and handle design govern the overall weight a knife has. Moreover, the weight of sheath should also be considered to determine the overall carrying weight. Heavy-duty survival knives such as the Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Campanion Fixed Blade Knife weigh more than 12 ounces with the sheath, while lighter versions weigh anywhere between 5-7 ounces, mainly because of a thinner blade and cloth sheath instead of Kydex or Leather one.
Check out the size and weight of the knife before picking the most suitable choice for your needs.

Additional features and miscellaneous considerations

In addition to the major criteria discussed above, there are some other miscellaneous considerations that can make a particular purchase more suitable for your needs.
One such factor is the support for left and right-hand designs. The shape of knife and handle is not such an issue with respect to the left or right hand as such knives are ambidextrous. The sheath is where the comfort level may vary, considering most sheaths are designed for right-handers. Though some manufacturers such as Mora offer specific sheaths for left-handers, with a little practice you can learn to operate your knife with the wrong-side sheath (just like the buttons of your shirts!).
Another factor that some people like to consider is the design and look of the knife. As an example, the hugely popular Mora Knives have a lot of sheath-and-handle color combinations available to suit your preference and personality (even have a female-friendly Magenta combination available!). For those who love a more vintage look, Condor Bushlore and Buck Knives offer a more vintage look with a scaled wooden handle.
Finally, the service provided by manufacturers is another major additional factor to consider. All the knives we listed above are backed by a limited lifetime warranty and hence are tough enough to withstand years of use. Some manufacturers such as Buck Knives, Benchmade and Spyderco go well beyond the warranty and provide sharpening and cleaning services with their knives. All you need to do is to pay is shipping and handling (about $7-8 in total per knife), and you would get unmatched professional maintenance service. Manufacturers such as ESEE and Ka-bar do not provide such services themselves but can recommend such services if requested.
You can look at all these features to determine if they make a specific fixed-blade knife a better choice for your needs.

Which are the best fixed blade knives and what our picks are?

Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Knife – Editor’s pick for the best budget fixed blade knife

best budget fixed blade knife
When it comes to budget fixed-blade knives, the popular, Swedish-made Morakniv knives (commonly referred to as Mora as they are made in Mora, Sweden) find a lot of mention and for good reason. The Mora Companion is an excellent fixed blade knife.

The Mora Companion has a decently sized 4.1-inch drop-point blade made with the high-quality Sandvik 12C27 steel, with a Rockwell hardness rating of 56-58. The blade is ground thin (at a 23-degree angle) with the old-fashioned Scandi-grind to create a small edge bevel. The blade has a thickness of only 2.5 mm. but is pretty sturdy for its weight. Still, if you are looking for a thicker blade, you can pick the Mora Companion Heavy Duty Carbon Steel knife, which has a 3.2 mm thick blade.

The thin blade means that the knife performs well in tasks such as slicing, and push/pull cutting. Moreover, the stainless steel blade provides superior staining and corrosion protection. The plain edge blade is most popular, though you can also get a Serrated version in the market.

The Companion has a 4.5-inch handle and with an overall length of 8.6 inches, it is pretty comfortable to handle. The blade is about 75% tang (3/4 tang) and features a patterned, rubberized plastic handle with a small curve on the butt for superior grip. This curve, however, means that the knife is not very suitable for pommel hammering.

The Mora Companion comes the standard one-piece, color combination, hard plastic sheath with a belt clip for easy carry. There is also a drip hole in the sheath to let the moisture out. The knife fits snugly in the sheath with a friction fit.

What’s more, the knife comes in a lot of color combinations ranging from Orange, Military Green to female-friendly Purple. This unique coloring makes it an excellent buy for young adults.

And like all other Morakniv knives, the Companion fixed-blade knife is backed by a limited lifetime warranty for manufacturing defects. The sheath has a warranty of 1-year, though believe us, it would last longer than most other sheaths in budget knives.

For its great value for money, lightweight and decent performance, the Morakniv Companion is our Editor’s pick for the best budget fixed blade knife. If you are looking for a beautiful, yet simple knife for basic outdoor tasks such as slicing, dicing and cutting, consider getting this knife and you would not be disappointed.
Pros
  • High-quality, ultralight, made in the Sweden knife with a Sandvik 14C27N stainless steel blade.
  • Drop point blade with a hardness rating of HRC 57-58 and superior corrosion resistance.
  • Comfortable 4.5-inch rubberized plastic handle which is ergonomically designed for easy grip.
  • Comes with a one-piece friction-fit plastic sheath in matching color combinations.
  • Competitively priced and backed by a limited lifetime warranty.
Cons
  • Thin blade and not full tang. 3/4 tang means that it cannot be used for heavy-duty survival and bushcrafting tasks.

Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Campanion Fixed Blade Knife – Editor’s pick for the best mid-range fixed blade knife

best mid-range fixed blade knife
The name Ka-Bar has long been synonymous with quality fixed blade knives for years because of probably the most popular fixed blade knife in the world – the Ka-Bar USMC fixed blade fighting knife. But when it comes to a mid-range survival knife, the Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Campanion is our favorite choice.

Designed by Ethan Becker, the Ka-Bar Becker is an excellent heavy-duty fixed blade knife. This made in the US knife features a 1095 Cro-Van carbon steel full-tang, drop point blade with a Rockwell hardness rating of HRC 56-58. The blade is flat-ground and powder coated for superior staining and corrosion resistance. The blade has a small Choil near the handle for use with fire-starters.

With a generous length of 5.25 inches and a thickness of 6.35 mm (1/4 inch), you can do a number of survival or bushcraft tasks with this knife. You can use it for batoning, hammering, cutting, carving, dicing, and even cooking.

The knife is 10.5 inches long, which means it has a long, comfortable handle. The knife comes with a standard glass-reinforced Grivory Nylon handle, though you can get the knife with handle options such as Micarta as well. The knife has a heavy pommel that can be conveniently used for hammering or crushing things. The handle also features an oversized lanyard hole.

The Ka-Bar Becker comes with a hard-shell Plastic and Nylon sheath. The knife fits in the sheath with a friction click and can be secured with a button-strap. The sheath has excellent knife retention, even in cold weathers, so you do not have to worry about losing the knife while on the move. The only drawback with the sheath is that it has a belt loop instead of a clip, so you would have to remove the belt to get the sheath off.

Moreover, like all other Ka-Bar knives, the Ka-Bar Becker BK2 is backed by a lifetime warranty for manufacturing defects, so you can use it in the field without a lot of worries.

For its heavy-duty, full-tang, ultra-durable design and superior quality, the Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Campanion is our Editor’s pick for the best mid-range fixed blade knife. If you are looking for a do-it-all fixed blade knife and not too worried about the weight, you should check it out.
Pros
  • Extremely durable, full tang knife featuring a 5.25 inch, 1095 Cro-Van steel drop point blade.
  • Thick, flat-ground blade with powder coating for durability and weather resistance.
  • Long GR Nylon handle with a heavy pommel for hammering tasks.
  • Excellent Plastic-Nylon sheath with excellent knife retention.
  • Backed by a limited lifetime warranty.
Cons
  • Heavier than most other similar-sized fixed blade knives.
  • The sheath has a belt loop instead of a clip, so taking it off can be a hassle.

ESEE 5P Fixed Blade Survival Knife – Editor’s pick for the best high-end fixed blade knife

best high-end fixed blade knife
For fixed bladed knives in the range of $100-200 dollars, ESEE (formerly RAT Cutlery) is probably one of the most respected US-based brand and the ESEE-5 is an excellent member of the flagship range. It is extremely beefy and heavy-duty and fit for almost any Survival and Bushcraft challenge you can throw at it.

This made in the US, beast of a knife features a full-tang 5.25 inch long, 1095 carbon steel drop point blade.

The blade is a whopping 6.35 mm (0.25 inch) thick, with an extra wide spine and that is where most of the weight comes from. The blade has a hardness rating of HRC 57 and is textured and powder coated for corrosion resistance and durability. You would, however, have to take good care of the blade by frequently cleaning and sharpening it for field use. You can use this knife for batoning, heavy hammering, cutting branches and ropes, even processing your game.

The knife is about 11 inches long and weighs around a full 1-pound with an extra-long handle. The handle is canvas-covered Micarta with a cord tie hole at the end. The knife has a generous pommel which can act as a very effective glass breaker.

If you are concerned about the weight, you can go with the smaller 3.9- inch blade ESEE-3 or the 4.1-inch blade ESEE-4 knives. Similarly, if you are looking for a longer blade, you can check out the popular 6.5-inch blade ESEE-6P knife.

The ESEE 5P comes with a standard Kydex sheath with a belt clip for easy carry and mount/dismount. The sheath also has a retention screw for secure carry when on the move. The sheath is good enough to last more than a couple of years.

The ESEE knives are of such high quality and durability that they are backed by an unconditional manufacturer warranty. So you can consider them true BIFL (buy-it-for-life) products.

For its tank-like build and superior performance, the ESEE 5P Fixed Blade Survival Knife is our Editor’s pick for the best high-end fixed blade knife for hunting, bushcrafting and survival camping. If money is not a concern, then you should definitely consider adding this knife to your collection.
Pros
  • An excellent high-end fixed blade knife with a 1095 Carbon steel, drop point blade.
  • Precisely crafted, full tang, heavy-duty 5.25-inch blade with hardness rating of HRC 57.
  • Features a quality canvas-Micarta handle with a cord-tie hole and heavy pommel that can work as a glass breaker.
  • Comes with an extra-strong Kydex sheath with a belt clip.
  • Backed by a limited lifetime warranty
Cons
  • Pretty heavy for day hiking or EDC.

Accessories for knife sharpening and care

One of the most important accessory to consider for your pocket knife is the knife sharpener. While fixed knives require less maintenance and you still need to periodically sharpen the blade. We list some of the popular standard sharpening options below:

Another closely related accessory is the knife cleaning gear. You can generally get a leather pad, knife oil or a cleaning cloth separately as per your needs, but if you are looking for a kit, you can check out the popular Rusty’s Rags Knife Care and Cleaning Kit or Flitz KR 41511 Knife Restoration Care Kit.

Final thoughts on the best fixed blade knives to buy

In this article, we looked at some of the most suitable fixed blade knives available in the market for outdoor activities such as hunting, bushcraft and survival camping. We looked at how fixed-blade knives are different from folders and the situations in which you would find them more convenient to use.

Our focus was on knives in three different price ranges and a blade length of not more than 6 inches. While you can get costlier and bigger knives, you would find the products we listed as reasonably suitable for all your needs. We also suggested some small fixed-blade knives (around 3.5-inch) which have become more popular in last few years for EDC because of their lighter weight and convenient size. Moreover, we shared the major factors to consider while picking such knives and some of the accessories that might be helpful in proper upkeep.

Hopefully, this article would help you in picking the next fixed-blade knife for your requirements. Do let us know your feedback by commenting below. Till next time, happy camping!

Related links

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